She Moved Through The Faire – Martyn Wylde

Martyn Wylde (again) singing the traditional Irish folk song “She Moved Through The Faire”.

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John Renbourn

On a Facebook page that I moderate – Folk Music of the British Isles – I frequently post articles about and videos of artists that I admire. In selecting items to post there I began to notice a decided bias toward fingerstyle guitarist/folk singers who have influenced my own music. The first of these is John Renbourn. This is not intended to be a full biography – rather it is his musical history through my experience of it. I bought my first John Renbourn album only about thirteen years ago!. Although I was vaguely aware there had been a group called Pentangle in the 1960s, I can’t recall ever actually hearing their music or knowing the names of any of the members. I came to that album, 1977’s A Maid in Bedlam, through my interest in the music I was hearing at renaissance festivals. Knowing I was a guitarist, one of the faire musicians recommended it as a place to start exploring traditional British folk. I was instantly enthralled by Renbourn’s guitar artistry and by the singing of Jacqui McShee. herself a former member of Pentangle. Three songs from that album were regularly performed at faire, and they, along with a fourth – Black Waterside – are still part of my repertoire today. The John Renbourn Group also recorded a live album in 1981 – Live in America – which contained many more song gems to be mined, particularly The Trees They Grow High, which had been recorded by Pentangle and which I recorded with Wyldefyre on our album All’s Faire. This song is known by various titles – The Trees They Do Grow High, Daily Growing, Bonny Boy, etc. According to Roud and Bishop (British folk song cataloguers and historians) “Judging by the number of versions gathered in the major manuscript collections and later sound recordings, this song has been a firm favourite with singers in Britain, Ireland and North America for a long time, the wording varies surprisingly little across the English versions and the story is always the same, and these probably derive from nineteenth-century broadside printings, of which there are many.” Although the song is found much earlier, two verses having been discovered in David Herd’s manuscript collection dating from the 1770s, it may have been based on an actual arranged marriage from 1634! But I digress… http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CwlRqTk3ir8 After being led to those first albums, I have gone through Renbourn’s back catalog. His teaming with fellow guitarist Bert Jansch in Pentangle is now deservedly legendary and his solo work and later collaborations shine with unparralled creativity and technique. Renbourn’s interest in early and renaissance music was in evidence on his solo album Sir John a Lot (1968) and his Celtic influences shone on later solo outings such as The Hermit and The Nine Maidens, which featured, among others, tunes by the legendary Irish harper/composer Turlough O’Carolan. In the mid-1980s Renbourn earned a degree in music composition from Dartlington School of Arts in Devon (now part of University College, Falmouth – how’s that for trivia?). Over the years he has had many lucrative musical collaborators, among them Stefan Grossman, bard Robin Williamson (Incredible String Band), the aforementioned Jacqui McShee and many more. He’s recorded a series of video lessons for aspiring guitarists, contributed to film soundtracks and much more. In 2011 he released Palermo Snow, a collection of instrumental guitar solos also featuring clarinetist Dick Lee – adding to the more than fifty albums which bear his name and his superb fingerstyle guitar. Talking of which, Martin Guitars have just issued the John Renbourn Signature Model. Now aged 69, John Renbourn has continued to record, tour and conducts guitar workshops all over the world including England, France and, recently, Crete! Attending one of these would be a true busman’s holiday for me.

http://www.martynwylde.com

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Silly Wizard

Silly Wizard was a Scottish folk band formed in 1970 in Edinburgh. The founding members were Gordon Jones, Johnny Cunningham and Bob Thomas.Thomas credited the name “Silly Wizard” to a roommate who was writing a book of children’s stories, and the group first performed under that name in the summer of 1972.

silly_wizard

With the additions of Andy M. Stewart as lead vocalist (and composer of classic songs like Queen of Argyll and Ramblin’ Rover), Johnny’s brother Phil Cunningham on accordion and Alastair Donaldson on bass, the group recorded their first album – Silly Wizard.

Silly Wizard played a variety of Scottish folk music – jigs, reels, and airs along with original tunes and songs. “Contemporary music that is firmly based in tradition,” was how one reviewer put it.

Stewart told Dirty Linen Magazine in 1991, “I think that it’s the general love of traditional music, interest in songs, and interest in things, not just Scottish music; certainly a big interest in Irish music and songs, which accounts for my interest, I think, across the board…”

Dougie MacLean, who had once been in a band with Andy Stewart, was a member of Silly Wizard for about six months, contributing to their fourth album, Wild & Beautiful.

They continued touring and recording until the late 1980s, weathering numerous personnel changes, when the band decided to dissolve after performing for seventeen years and releasing nine albums.

In December 2012, Silly Wizard was inducted into the Scottish Traditional Music Hall of Fame, and a remastered album of a 1983 concert in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Live Again, has just been released.

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